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3rd July
2009
written by naehblog

Okay, so every Friday, I’m going to try to have a news roundup of stories that were particularly interesting, or funny, or insightful, or really really awful (I’m kind of looking forward to writing about the last ones!).

Luckily for you, National Public Radio (NPR) and the Associated Press came to your rescue today.

Yesterday, the Department of Labor announced that unemployment had reached 9.5 percent – a 26-year high. The Associated Press and NPR reported that industry sectors across the board were hit fairly hard, with the bright spots being in education and medical fields.

There’s been a flurry of discussion about the recession and it’s impacts on homelessness: news about foreclosures and middle-class families and rising rates of homelessness across the country (check out the Daily Clips section of our website for a listing of related stories). But more troubling than those sensationalized stories are reports like this one about unemployment. While the recession may come and (hopefully) go, the root causes of homelessness – including a dearth of affordable housing, mental illness, and (yup) unemployment – are steadfast in the face of economic sways.

Also in the news today is a story about schizophrenia.

Recent genetic studies, according to reporting by NPR have shed some light on the development of schizophrenia.

Researchers, long stymied by puzzling disease, tried to find difference in the genes of thousands of people – some had schizophrenia; some didn’t.

The researchers found a few interesting leads, one of them linking schizophrenia to the immune system. Some are speculating that the “tendency to develop schizophrenia may have something to do with infections of mothers during pregnancy.”

While this article isn’t directly related to homelessness, there is a sizable percentage of the homeless population that we refer to as “chronic” – meaning that those people experiencing homelessness have a disability of some kind (anyone remember The Soloist? Jamie Foxx?) Moreover, the role of deinstitutionalization has been a part of the history of modern homelessness.

Let me know what you think of the stories, and don’t hesitate to shoot a shout out if you see anything that you might want to share!

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